What qualities make for a great caddy?

A caddie does not stand idly next to a golf star. A caddie’s presence alone brings additional value to the golf sports and the player, whether professional or amateur. 

A caddie does more aside from being a keeper of the golf bags. He is in charge of the things inside the golf bag, from balls to tees. He also repairs divots and rakes sand traps as part of his key assignments. 

When a golfer is ready to use a club, he hands out the requested club. After the golfer is finished taking the shot, the caddie will return the club in the bag while providing advice on the next shots. These are some of the unwritten tasks of a caddie. 

Caddies and golfer walking on the field

A caddie helps players to have a good game. A caddie becomes an indispensable ally of the player, noting that he knows how to play the game as well. He should bring an extra water bottle when the player gets thirsty.

Aptly said, a caddie brings an indelible mark to the success of a golfer. He is responsible for all aspects of a golf game, which is often frustrating and stressful. Ask Steve Williams.

Golf clubs and balls

Essential qualities of a great caddie

Trustworthy

A caddie is expected to know basic golf terminology and scoring from birdie, par, bogey, and many more. He should know the general club distances before the player hits a shot. He should be able to provide a pre-game checklist to the player. 

The caddie’s sufficient knowledge of the game will make it worthy of player’s trust. When the player is unsure of his next step, he trusts a caddie’s insight. For the player to achieve a chance to greatness, he needs a caddie that he can trust. 

Positive

A caddie is not only a sidekick. He also carries a sense of leadership in the field. This role happens when a player starts losing momentum during the game. 

A great caddie leads a player to stay active and cheerful, giving him positive feedback throughout the sporting game. 

He keeps the optimism alive, boosting the spirit of the golfer. He shares compliments as best as he can. 

When low moments find their way to the golfer, a caddie is ready to elevate the player’s mood. He exudes an air of cheerfulness. 

Honesty

A great caddie should be ready to tell the truth about the game and the player. Since a player does not want to hear lousy advice, a caddie should be willing to share the things that matter most to him on the field to win the game.

Knowledgeable 

The caddie’s knowledge of the game brings out the best of the player. His understanding and learning of the game will be the source of confidence of the golfer. 

His knowledge, be it on slopes, drives, or greens, is valuable, particularly to those playing a game for the first time.

Quick-minded

A great caddie can quickly answer the golfer once he is asked about the flow of the game. He should give all his focus on the game. When a player is commonly asked where the ball lands, a caddie should quickly spot it. 

His ample knowledge of the general area gives him the advantage of finding its location. A great caddie should watch and know where the ball went, whether it’s pitching onto the green or a drive from the tee box.

Organization 

A caddie knows what’s inside the bag that he is carrying. He should be able to organize it correctly, keeping the player’s bag organized. After a club is used, he should put it back in the proper manner and place. 

He should clean clubs after each shot. He should also clean the player’s golf balls at the start of each hole. He should carry a towel to do this.

When a piece of sod flies away together with the ball, a caddie should be responsible for replacing the divot. 

Once a player hits his shot, a caddie should retrieve the divot and place it back. When a player is finished hitting out of the sand, a caddie should get a rake and make the surface smooth again for the next player.

Furthermore, a caddie should know the different scores–pars and birdies. A caddie should be aware of the different clubs. He should see the process of winning the game. 

From knowing when a player uses a 6-iron or a 7-iron, a caddie should distinguish the difference. He should be aware that a player wouldn’t hit a 5-iron to arrive at a green that’s 250 yards distance.

He should know the course flow, with complete information on the sand traps or the water hazards. He should get this information by scrutinizing a scorecard or touring the course.